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Postoperative Complications of Patients With Spina Bifida Undergoing Urologic Laparotomy: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

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    • Abstract:
      Objective: To characterize perioperative morbidity and mortality in adult patients with spina bifida undergoing laparotomy.Patients and Methods: We retrospectively studied the postoperative complications of 59 operations of patients with spina bifida undergoing abdominal laparotomies for urologic indications at 3 institutions. We evaluated postoperative complications using the Clavien-Dindo classification scale.Results: The overall complication rate was 91.5%. The most common complications were ileus, pressure ulcers, urinary tract infection, and wound infection. Over 40% of the patients developed a class 3 or 4 complication requiring subsequent surgery or intensive care unit admission. The hospital readmission rate was 42% and was correlated with higher-grade complications. On multivariable analysis, only older age was significantly associated with grade of complication.Conclusion: These data demonstrate that adult patients with spina bifida comprise a unique population that faces an extremely high surgical risk even in centers of excellence. As patients with spina bifida live longer lives, thanks to modern medicine, there is a timely opportunity for research on perioperative management in these patients to improve postsurgical outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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