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Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      cognitive dysfunction
      employment
      magnetic resonance imaging metrics
      multiple sclerosis
      patient‐reported outcomes
      processing speed
    • Abstract:
      Background and purpose: To analyze the relationship between cognitive processing speed, patient‐reported outcome measures (PROMs), employment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics in a large multiple sclerosis cohort. Methods: Cross‐sectional clinical data, PROMs, employment and MRI studies within 90 days of completion of the Processing Speed Test (PST), a technology‐enabled adaptation of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, were collected. MRI was analyzed using semi‐automated methods. Correlations of PST score with PROMs and MRI metrics were examined using Spearman's rho. Wilcoxon rank sum testing compared MRI metrics across PST score quartiles and linear regression models identified predictors of PST performance. Effects of employment and depression were also investigated. Results: In 721 patients (mean age 47.6 ± 11.4 years), PST scores were significantly correlated with all MRI metrics, including cord atrophy and deep gray matter volumes. Linear regression demonstrated self‐reported physical disability, cognitive function, fatigue and social domains (adjusted R2 = 0.44, P < 0.001) as the strongest clinical predictors of PST score, whereas that of MRI variables included T2 lesion volume, whole‐brain fraction and cord atrophy (adjusted R2 = 0.42, P < 0.001). An inclusive model identified T2 lesion volume, whole‐brain fraction, self‐reported upper extremity function, cognition and social participation as the strongest predictors of PST score (adjusted R2 = 0.51, P < 0.001). There was significant effect modification by depression on the relationship between self‐reported cognition and PST performance. Employment status was associated with PST scores independent of age and physical disability. Conclusion: The PST score correlates with PROMs, MRI measures of focal and diffuse brain injury, and employment. The PST score is a feasible and meaningful measure for routine multiple sclerosis care. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • :
      Copyright of European Journal of Neurology is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Full Text Word Count:
      7346
    • ISSN:
      1351-5101
    • DOI:
      10.1111/ene.14239
    • Accession Number:
      144222261
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MACARON, G. et al. Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics. European Journal of Neurology, [s. l.], v. 27, n. 7, p. 1238–1249, 2020. DOI 10.1111/ene.14239. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=c9h&AN=144222261. Acesso em: 24 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Macaron G, Baldassari LE, Nakamura K, et al. Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics. European Journal of Neurology. 2020;27(7):1238-1249. doi:10.1111/ene.14239
    • APA:
      Macaron, G., Baldassari, L. E., Nakamura, K., Rao, S. M., McGinley, M. P., Moss, B. P., Li, H., Miller, D. M., Jones, S. E., Bermel, R. A., Cohen, J. A., Ontaneda, D., & Conway, D. S. (2020). Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics. European Journal of Neurology, 27(7), 1238–1249. https://doi.org/10.1111/ene.14239
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Macaron, G., L. E. Baldassari, K. Nakamura, S. M. Rao, M. P. McGinley, B. P. Moss, H. Li, et al. 2020. “Cognitive Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Practice: Association with Patient‐reported Outcomes, Employment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics.” European Journal of Neurology 27 (7): 1238–49. doi:10.1111/ene.14239.
    • Harvard:
      Macaron, G. et al. (2020) ‘Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics’, European Journal of Neurology, 27(7), pp. 1238–1249. doi: 10.1111/ene.14239.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Macaron, G, Baldassari, LE, Nakamura, K, Rao, SM, McGinley, MP, Moss, BP, Li, H, Miller, DM, Jones, SE, Bermel, RA, Cohen, JA, Ontaneda, D & Conway, DS 2020, ‘Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics’, European Journal of Neurology, vol. 27, no. 7, pp. 1238–1249, viewed 24 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Macaron, G., et al. “Cognitive Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Practice: Association with Patient‐reported Outcomes, Employment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics.” European Journal of Neurology, vol. 27, no. 7, July 2020, pp. 1238–1249. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/ene.14239.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Macaron, G., L. E. Baldassari, K. Nakamura, S. M. Rao, M. P. McGinley, B. P. Moss, H. Li, et al. “Cognitive Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Practice: Association with Patient‐reported Outcomes, Employment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics.” European Journal of Neurology 27, no. 7 (July 2020): 1238–49. doi:10.1111/ene.14239.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Macaron G, Baldassari LE, Nakamura K, Rao SM, McGinley MP, Moss BP, et al. Cognitive processing speed in multiple sclerosis clinical practice: association with patient‐reported outcomes, employment and magnetic resonance imaging metrics. European Journal of Neurology [Internet]. 2020 Jul [cited 2020 Sep 24];27(7):1238–49. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=c9h&AN=144222261