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Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study

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  • Source:
    Neuromodulation 2019 22 7, e448 (e448-) Published by: Blackwell Publishing Inc. Netherlands
  • Additional Information
    • Original Title:
      Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study
    • Contact Information:
      Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Psychology-Education and Child studies, Netherlands
    • Language:
      English
    • Publication Type:
      Journal: Conference Abstract
    • Record Status:
      This record is this issue.
    • Abstract:
      Introduction: The efficacy of repetitive transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as treatment for tobacco smokers has been studied with mixed results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of repetitive tDCS as a tool to reduce ad libitum smoking behaviour. We also aimed to determine the course of treatment effects by studying smoking behaviour for three months on a daily basis. Since smoking behaviour can fluctuate over time, we choose to use mobile ecological momentary assessments (EMA) instead of retrospective self-reports to measure changes in ad libitum smoking behaviour. Materials/Methods: The current study had a between subject, doubleblind, randomized, sham-controlled design (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/ show/NCT03027687). Smokers were randomly allocated to six sessions of either active tDCS (n = 35) or sham tDCS (n = 36). They were asked to keep track of their cigarette consumption and craving in an application on their mobile phones for three months. Results: Multilevel analysis showed that the mean number of smoked cigarettes slightly decreased from the first tDCS session up to one week after the last session (b=-.07, t(471)= -2.086, p =.038) for both active tDCS and sham tDCS (see Figure). However, active tDCS had no additional effect on reducing cigarette consumption and craving compared to sham tDCS. Discussion: The findings of the current study are in contrast with observations from previous studies that have shown that tDCS is effective in reducing cigarette smoking and cigarette craving. Methodological differences that may explain the contradicting findings are the number of tDCS sessions, the motivation of smokers to quit, and the use of EMA instead of retrospective self-reports. Conclusions: Repetitive bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC had no effect on daily smoking behavior in ad libitum smokers. Objectives: Future studies need to investigate to what extent motivation to quit smoking and the number of tDCS sessions influence the efficacy of repetitive tDCS. The use of EMA is recommended for its ecological validity.
    • EMBASE keywords:
      *cigarette smoking; conference abstract; controlled study; craving; dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; double blind procedure; *ecological momentary assessment; ecological validity; human; mobile phone; motivation; multilevel analysis; randomized controlled trial (topic); self report; smoking cessation; systematic review; transcranial direct current stimulation
    • Accession Number:
      631895227
    • Source:
      This document should be cited as: . Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study 2019 (The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR/CENTRAL). DOI: 10.1111/ner.12958. Oxford: Update Software. Updated quarterly.
    • Accession Number:
      CN-02147817
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study. Neuromodulation, [s. l.], v. 22, n. 7, p. e448, 2019. DOI 10.1111/ner.12958. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cgh&AN=CN-02147817. Acesso em: 25 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study. Neuromodulation. 2019;22(7):e448. doi:10.1111/ner.12958
    • APA:
      Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study. (2019). Neuromodulation, 22(7), e448. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12958
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      “Efficacy of Repetitive Tdcs on Ad Libitum Smoking Behaviour: An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” 2019. Neuromodulation 22 (7): e448. doi:10.1111/ner.12958.
    • Harvard:
      ‘Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study’ (2019) Neuromodulation, 22(7), p. e448. doi: 10.1111/ner.12958.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      ‘Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study’ 2019, Neuromodulation, vol. 22, no. 7, p. e448, viewed 25 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      “Efficacy of Repetitive Tdcs on Ad Libitum Smoking Behaviour: An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” Neuromodulation, vol. 22, no. 7, Jan. 2019, p. e448. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/ner.12958.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      “Efficacy of Repetitive Tdcs on Ad Libitum Smoking Behaviour: An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” Neuromodulation 22, no. 7 (January 1, 2019): e448. doi:10.1111/ner.12958.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Efficacy of repetitive tdcs on ad libitum smoking behaviour: an ecological momentary assessment study. Neuromodulation [Internet]. 2019 Jan 1 [cited 2020 Oct 25];22(7):e448. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cgh&AN=CN-02147817