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The association between chronotype, food craving and weight gain in pregnant women.

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    • Abstract:
      Background: This cross‐sectional study investigated the association between chronotype, food craving and weight gain in pregnant women. Methods: In total, 245 pregnant women attending the public health service in Brazil were included. Chronotype was derived from the time of mid‐sleep time on free days, with a further correction for calculated sleep debt, and higher scores on this variable indicate a tendency to eveningness. A Food Craving Questionnaire Trait and State assessment was performed, and weight gain was calculated. Generalised linear models were used to determine the association between the variables under analysis. Results: Evening types presented higher anticipation of relief from negative states and feelings as a result of eating as a usual behaviour compared to morning (P = 0.013) and non‐evening types (P = 0.028); less intense desire to eat as a sporadic behaviour compared to morning (P = 0.012) and non‐evening types (P = 0.009); and less anticipation of positive reinforcement that may result from eating as a sporadic behaviour than non‐evening types (P = 0.022). We also found a significant association between chronotype score and anticipation of relief from negative states and feelings as a result of eating (P = 0.004); anticipation of positive reinforcement that may result from eating (P = 0.013) as a usual behaviour; weight gain during the early gestational period (P = 0.024); and intense desire to eat (P = 0.045) as a sporadic behaviour. Conclusions: We conclude that evening chronotype was associated with the food craving trait. Pregnant women who tend to eveningness are more likely to gain weight in the early gestational period. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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