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Current State of Preeclampsia Mouse Models: Approaches, Relevance, and Standardization.

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    • Abstract:
      Preeclampsia (PE) is a multisystemic, pregnancy-specific disorder and a leading cause of maternal and fetal death. PE is also associated with an increased risk for chronic morbidities later in life for mother and offspring. Abnormal placentation or placental function has been well-established as central to the genesis of PE; yet much remains to be determined about the factors involved in the development of this condition. Despite decades of investigation and many clinical trials, the only definitive treatment is parturition. To better understand the condition and identify potential targets preclinically, many approaches to simulate PE in mice have been developed and include mixed mouse strain crosses, genetic overexpression and knockout, exogenous agent administration, surgical manipulation, systemic adenoviral infection, and trophoblast-specific gene transfer. These models have been useful to investigate how biological perturbations identified in human PE are involved in the generation of PE-like symptoms and have improved the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the human condition. However, these approaches were characterized by a wide variety of physiological endpoints, which can make it difficult to compare effects across models and many of these approaches have aspects that lack physiological relevance to this human disorder and may interfere with therapeutic development. This report provides a comprehensive review of mouse models that exhibit PE-like symptoms and a proposed standardization of physiological characteristics for analysis in murine models of PE. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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