Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Role of electronic excitation in phase-change memory materials: A brief review.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Phase-change memory (PCM) materials, such as chalcogenide alloys, have the ability for fast and reversible transition between their amorphous and crystalline states. Owing to the large optical/electrical contrast of the two states, PCM materials have been developed for data storage. It has been generally accepted that thermal effects, caused by laser irradiation or electrical pulses, control the amorphization by melting the sample and subsequent quenching, while crystallization is realized by thermal annealing. An important element that has not been considered extensively, however, is the role of electronic excitation by optical or electrical pulse. Strictly speaking, until electrons and holes recombine, the system under external stimulus is in a non-equilibrium environment, especially when the excitation intensity is high. This raises an important question: can the excitation alone induce phase transition for PCM data storage without the usual thermal melting? Here, we will review the recent experimental and theoretical indications and evidence in support of the electronic excitation-induced phase change in PCM materials and discuss potential ramifications of the athermal phase-change phenomenon for data storage. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Physica Status Solidi (B) is the property of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)