Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      a Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA
      b Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
      c Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, Corporal Michael J Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, USA
      d Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
      e Departments of Preventive Medicine and Psychpology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    • Keywords:
      Alcohol
      Tobacco
      Marijuana
      Comorbidity
      Co-use
      Polydrug abuse
      Sex differences
    • Abstract:
      Highlights •Alcohol consumption increased odds of same-day cigarette or marijuana co-use.•Cigarette smoking increased the odds of same-day alcohol or marijuana co-use.•Marijuana use increased the odds of same-day alcohol or cigarette co-use.•The co-use of two substances generally increased the likelihood of a using a third.•Co-use of alcohol and marijuana produced sub-additive effects on cigarette tri-use.
    • Abstract:
      Methods Participants (N = 551) completed an in-person interview for alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use over the previous 30 days, and the event-level substance use patterns of n = 179 participants who reported using each of these substances at least once per month were analyzed.
    • Abstract:
      Results The use of alcohol, marijuana, or cigarettes independently increased the probability of subsequent, simultaneous co-use of one of the two remaining substances. The co-use of alcohol with cigarettes and marijuana with cigarettes produced generally additive effects on the odds of same day tri-use of marijuana and alcohol, respectively. Conversely, the co-use of alcohol and marijuana produced sub-additive effects on likelihood of cigarette use. Sex moderated several of the observed patterns of co- and tri-use: the relationship between alcohol or cigarette use predicting marijuana co-use was stronger in men, whereas the observed additive relationships between drug co-use leading to tri-use was stronger in women.
    • Abstract:
      Conclusions The presented results may aid in the understanding of how simultaneous co-use of marijuana with alcohol and/or tobacco relates to the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of comorbid and trimorbid substance use disorder. Replication and extension of the results in treatment seeking populations using more fine-grained analysis approaches, e.g. ecological momentary assessment, is needed.
    • ISSN:
      0376-8716
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035
    • Accession Number:
      S0376871619301449
    • Copyright:
      © 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ROCHE, D. J. O. et al. Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, [s. l.], v. 200, p. 40–49, 2019. DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0376871619301449. Acesso em: 27 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Roche DJO, Bujarski S, Green R, Hartwell EE, Leventhal AM, Ray LA. Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2019;200:40-49. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035
    • APA:
      Roche, D. J. O., Bujarski, S., Green, R., Hartwell, E. E., Leventhal, A. M., & Ray, L. A. (2019). Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 200, 40–49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Roche, D.J.O., S. Bujarski, R. Green, E.E. Hartwell, A.M. Leventhal, and L.A. Ray. 2019. “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Consumption Is Associated with Increased Odds of Same-Day Substance Co- and Tri-Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 200 (July): 40–49. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035.
    • Harvard:
      Roche, D. J. O. et al. (2019) ‘Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use’, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 200, pp. 40–49. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Roche, DJO, Bujarski, S, Green, R, Hartwell, EE, Leventhal, AM & Ray, LA 2019, ‘Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use’, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 200, pp. 40–49, viewed 27 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Roche, D. J. O., et al. “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Consumption Is Associated with Increased Odds of Same-Day Substance Co- and Tri-Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 200, July 2019, pp. 40–49. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Roche, D.J.O., S. Bujarski, R. Green, E.E. Hartwell, A.M. Leventhal, and L.A. Ray. “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Consumption Is Associated with Increased Odds of Same-Day Substance Co- and Tri-Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 200 (July 1, 2019): 40–49. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.035.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Roche DJO, Bujarski S, Green R, Hartwell EE, Leventhal AM, Ray LA. Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana consumption is associated with increased odds of same-day substance co- and tri-use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence [Internet]. 2019 Jul 1 [cited 2020 Sep 27];200:40–9. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0376871619301449