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Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      a Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Box G-S121-4, Providence, RI, 02912, United States
      b University of Saint Joseph, 1678 Asylum Avenue, West Hartford, CT, 06117, United States
      c Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies, 607 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854-8001, United States
    • Keywords:
      Alcohol
      Marijuana
      Concurrent
      Simultaneous
      CAM
      SAM
      Co-use
    • Abstract:
      Highlights •Alcohol and marijuana are frequently used simultaneously.•There is no consistent operational definition for “simultaneous” use.•Competing time-based operationalizations of simultaneity were investigated.•Daily co-use of alcohol and marijuana increased risk versus single-substance use.•Risks of simultaneous use remains significant, regardless of operationalization.
    • Abstract:
      Methods A sample of 341 young adult college students who reported past-month use of both alcohol and marijuana “at the same time so that their effects overlapped” completed a two-wave survey with paired 28-day daily experience sampling bursts examining alcohol and marijuana co-use. Outcomes were (a) daily substance-use related consequences; and (b) daily subjective intoxication. Focal predictors were daily drinks and marijuana uses; daily co-use versus single-substance use (Aim 1) or CAM versus SAM (Aim 2); and their interaction.
    • Abstract:
      Results Participants reported more negative consequences on co-use days versus marijuana-only days and greater subjective intoxication relative to alcohol or marijuana-only days. Competing operationalizations of SAM, defined as daily co-use occurring within 1−240 min in increments of 1 min, found no difference in consequences or subjective intoxication regardless of operationalization.
    • Abstract:
      Conclusion Co-use days involve greater risk than alcohol-only or marijuana-only days. Although there was no evidence of additional daily risk from simultaneous use regardless of the timeframe used to operationalize it, investigating these effects remains challenging due to the generally small timeframe between substances on co-use days in this sample.
    • ISSN:
      0376-8716
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986
    • Accession Number:
      S0376871620301514
    • Copyright:
      © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SOKOLOVSKY, A. W. et al. Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, [s. l.], v. 212, 2020. DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0376871620301514. Acesso em: 20 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Sokolovsky AW, Gunn RL, Micalizzi L, White HR, Jackson KM. Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2020;212. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986
    • APA:
      Sokolovsky, A. W., Gunn, R. L., Micalizzi, L., White, H. R., & Jackson, K. M. (2020). Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Sokolovsky, Alexander W., Rachel L. Gunn, Lauren Micalizzi, Helene R. White, and Kristina M. Jackson. 2020. “Alcohol and Marijuana Co-Use: Consequences, Subjective Intoxication, and the Operationalization of Simultaneous Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 212 (July). doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986.
    • Harvard:
      Sokolovsky, A. W. et al. (2020) ‘Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use’, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 212. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Sokolovsky, AW, Gunn, RL, Micalizzi, L, White, HR & Jackson, KM 2020, ‘Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use’, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 212, viewed 20 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Sokolovsky, Alexander W., et al. “Alcohol and Marijuana Co-Use: Consequences, Subjective Intoxication, and the Operationalization of Simultaneous Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 212, July 2020. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Sokolovsky, Alexander W., Rachel L. Gunn, Lauren Micalizzi, Helene R. White, and Kristina M. Jackson. “Alcohol and Marijuana Co-Use: Consequences, Subjective Intoxication, and the Operationalization of Simultaneous Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 212 (July 1, 2020). doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Sokolovsky AW, Gunn RL, Micalizzi L, White HR, Jackson KM. Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence [Internet]. 2020 Jul 1 [cited 2020 Sep 20];212. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0376871620301514