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Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis

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  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Abstract:
      Depressive symptoms are prevalent in older adults, and both aging and depression are independently associated with cognitive deficits, particularly in executive control--high-level cognitive control processes that are supported by the frontal lobes and are believed to mediate other aspects of cognition. This pattern of cognitive difficulties suggests older depressed adults may be at "double jeopardy" for executive dysfunction due to the combined effects of aging and depression. Using event-related potentials (ERPs) acquired in the context of a trial-by-trial task-switching version of the Stroop task, we temporally dissociated regulative components of cognitive control, which support the activation and implementation of control, and include such functions as context encoding and maintenance, and conflict resolution.As predicted, older adults showed clear behavioral evidence of impaired cognitive control, reflected in a disproportionate increase in error rates and slowing of reaction time on the incongruent color-naming, or interference, task condition. Depressive symptomatology was associated with greater impairment in older, but not younger adults. ERP findings showed that older adults were impaired in context encoding and maintenance, and conflict resolution. Depressive symptomatology was associated with inefficient recruitment of neural resources in older but not younger adults. Overall, the current findings suggest that impairments in context encoding, context maintenance, and conflict resolution contribute to cognitive control dysfunction in older adults, and that aging and depression have a synergistic effect on cognitive control (i.e., the combined effect is greater than the sum of the individual effects). These findings further our understanding of the relationship between aging, depression, and cognition and suggest older depressed adults are particularly vulnerable to cognitive decline. This line of research may aid in the development of assessment and intervention strategies for older depressed adults. (Author Abstract, used by permission) (AgeLine Database, copyright 2007 EBSCO Publishing, Inc., all rights reserved)
    • Publication Information:
      Publication Type: Dissertation ISBN: 978-054-280-5837837
    • Target Audience:
      Research
    • Availability:
      Full text available at: http://etd.fcla.edu/UF/UFE0014368/king
    • Accession Number:
      937112
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DOTSON, V. M. Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis. [s. l.]: UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI, 2006. ISBN 978-054-280-5837837. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112. Acesso em: 24 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Dotson VM. Cumulative Disadvantage in Cognitive Control Due to Depression and Aging: Double Jeopardy Hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI; 2006. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112
    • APA:
      Dotson, V. M. (2006). Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Dotson, Vonetta M. 2006. Cumulative Disadvantage in Cognitive Control Due to Depression and Aging: Double Jeopardy Hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112.
    • Harvard:
      Dotson, V. M. (2006) Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112 (Accessed: 24 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Dotson, VM 2006, Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis, UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI, viewed 24 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Dotson, Vonetta M. Cumulative Disadvantage in Cognitive Control Due to Depression and Aging: Double Jeopardy Hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI, 2006. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Dotson, Vonetta M. Cumulative Disadvantage in Cognitive Control Due to Depression and Aging: Double Jeopardy Hypothesis. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI, 2006. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Dotson VM. Cumulative disadvantage in cognitive control due to depression and aging: double jeopardy hypothesis [Internet]. UMI Dissertation Services, ProQuest Information and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI; 2006 [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=937112