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Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress

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  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Abstract:
      Research on age differences in emotional responses to daily stress has produced inconsistent findings. Guided by recent theoretical advances in aging theory (S. T. Charles, 2010, Strength and vulnerability integration: A model of emotional well-being across adulthood, Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 136, pp. 1068-1091) that emphasize the importance of context for predicting when and how age is related to affective well-being, the current study examined age differences in emotional responses to everyday stressors. The present study examined how three contextual features (e.g., timing of exposure, stressor severity, global perceived stress [GPS]) moderate age differences in emotional experience in an ecological momentary assessment study of adults (A/ = 190) aged 18-81 years. Results indicated that older adults' negative affect (NA) was less affected by exposure to recent stressors than younger adults, but that there were no age differences in the effects of stressor exposure 3-6 hr afterward. Higher levels of GPS predicted amplified NA responses to daily stress, and controlling for GPS eliminated age differences in NA responses to stressors. No age differences in NA responses as a function of stressor severity were observed. In contrast, older age was associated with less of a decrease in PA when exposed to recent stressors or with more severe recent stressors. There were no age differences in the effect of previous stressor exposure or severity on PA, or any interactions between momentary or previous stress and GPS on PA. Together, these results support the notion that chronic stress plays a central role in emotional experience in daily life. We discuss the implications of these results for emotion theories of aging. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR (Copyright of Psychology & Aging is the property of American Psychological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract.)
    • Accession Number:
      AFFECT (Psychology); AROUSAL (Physiology); age; daily stress; emotions
    • Publication Information:
      Publication Type: Journal Article ISSN: 0882-7974
    • Accession Number:
      EP93315048
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SCOTT, S. B.; SLIWINSKI, M. J.; BLANCHARD-FIELDS, F. Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress. Psychology and Aging, [s. l.], v. 28, n. 4, p. 1076–1087, 2013. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048. Acesso em: 31 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Scott SB, Sliwinski MJ, Blanchard-Fields F. Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress. Psychology and Aging. 2013;28(4):1076-1087. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048
    • APA:
      Scott, S. B., Sliwinski, M. J., & Blanchard-Fields, F. (2013). Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress. Psychology and Aging, 28(4), 1076–1087.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Scott, Stacey B., Martin J. Sliwinski, and Fredda Blanchard-Fields. 2013. “Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress.” Psychology and Aging 28 (4): 1076–87. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048.
    • Harvard:
      Scott, S. B., Sliwinski, M. J. and Blanchard-Fields, F. (2013) ‘Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress’, Psychology and Aging, 28(4), pp. 1076–1087. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048 (Accessed: 31 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Scott, SB, Sliwinski, MJ & Blanchard-Fields, F 2013, ‘Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress’, Psychology and Aging, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1076–1087, viewed 31 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Scott, Stacey B., et al. “Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress.” Psychology and Aging, vol. 28, no. 4, Dec. 2013, pp. 1076–1087. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Scott, Stacey B., Martin J. Sliwinski, and Fredda Blanchard-Fields. “Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress.” Psychology and Aging 28, no. 4 (December 1, 2013): 1076–87. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Scott SB, Sliwinski MJ, Blanchard-Fields F. Age Differences in Emotional Responses to Daily Stress: The Role of Timing, Severity, and Global Perceived Stress. Psychology and Aging [Internet]. 2013 Dec 1 [cited 2020 Oct 31];28(4):1076–87. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=gnh&AN=EP93315048