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Primary care use by men with symptoms of possible prostate cancer: A multi‐method study with an ethnically diverse sample in London.

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    • Abstract:
      Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate primary care use by men with recent onset of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to identify differences in presentation and investigation that may explain ethnic inequality in prostate cancer outcomes. Methods: This is a multi‐method study of men presenting LUTS to primary care. Two hundred seventy‐four men completed a self‐administered questionnaire, and 23 participated in face‐to‐face interviews. Regression analyses investigated ethnic differences in (a) the period between symptom onset and first primary care presentation (patient interval) and (b) the interval between first primary care presentation and investigation with prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal examination (DRE). Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Half (144, 53%) reported a solitary first symptom, although multiple first symptoms were also common, particularly in Asian and Black men. There was no difference between ethnicities in patient interval or time from presentation to investigation. However, Asian men were offered less PSA testing (odds ratio 0.39; 95% confidence interval 0.17–0.92; p = 0.03). Qualitative data revealed ethnic differences in general practitioners' offer of DRE and PSA testing and highlighted limitations in doctor–patient communication and safety netting. Conclusion: Our study showed only small differences in primary care experiences, insufficient to explain ethnic inequalities in prostate cancer outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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