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Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Address:
      Wageningen School of Social Sciences (WASS), Wageningen, Netherlands.
    • Publication Information:
      Netherlands
    • Abstract:
      Chapter 1 presents the background information relevant to the subject matter and methods of this thesis. These include the application of social and behavioural sciences in malaria control, the SolarMal project and malaria in Kenya. It also presents the research objective, question and design that informed this thesis. Chapter 2 systematically documented and analysed how the mosquito trapping technology and related social contexts mutually shaped each other and how this mutual shaping impacted the design and re-design of the intervention. Our analysis focused on the design, re-design and piloting of the innovative approach to controlling malaria largely before its field implementation had started. During the pre-intervention year, various aspects of the intervention were re-designed ahead of the project roll-out. In chapter 3, this thesis investigated immediate community response to the innovation and the implications for ongoing implementation and supportive community communication outreach. The explorations found that the main benefit of SMoTS to study participants was house lighting and suggested that the main reason that people adhered to recommended behaviours for SMoTS deployment was to ensure uninterrupted lighting at night, rather than reducing mosquito biting or malaria risk. Electrification led to a number of immediate benefits including reduced expenditure on kerosene and telephone charging and conveniences (such as lit early mornings and late nights, increased study hours, etc.). The changes brought about by electric lighting provided conveniences which improved the welfare of residents. Some respondents also reported hearing fewer mosquito sounds when interviewed a few weeks after a SMoTS was installed in their house. On the question of maintenance, we found that residents of Rusinga Island adequately maintained SMoTS. Households also reported maintenance needs to the project and project technicians carried out repair and maintenance needs. Chapter 4 documented the perceived impact of SMoTs on family dynamics, social and economic status, and the community as a whole. The findings suggest that even when the use of energy is restricted, electricity can enhance the value of life. Chapter 5 evaluated the knowledge, perceptions and practices related to malaria control before and after the roll-out of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems. As a malaria control strategy, SMoTS were installed in Rusinga to complement the existing use of longlasting insecticidal nets (LLINS) and prompt malaria care seeking. The message about the complementariness of SMoTS as a malaria strategy was further stressed during social mobilisation to encourage continued use of LLINs and prompt malaria care seeking. The findings suggest that overall, the SolarMal project did not induce a negative effect of the innovation on the uptake of existing malaria strategies. Chapter 6 investigated whether the community preferred individual or cooperative solutions for organising the sustainability components of SMoTS, and whether and how known social dilemma factors could be recognised in the reasoning of actors. Chapter 7 synthesises the main findings. Subsequently, this results in the overall conclusions of the thesis that are discussed within the broader debates on research and policy. This thesis shows that SolarMal was not only a technical innovation, but required new social organisational arrangements to go with it.
    • Number of References:
      many ref.
    • Subject Terms:
      Tropical Diseases;Rural Development;Protozoology;Medical & Veterinary Entomology
    • Subject Terms:
    • Accession Number:
      behavior modification, citizen participation, control programs, parasitic diseases, parasitic infestations, parasitosis, protozoal diseases, social aspects, subsaharan Africa
    • CABICODES:
      Other Control Measures (HH700)
      Community Participation and Development (UU450) (New March 2000)
      Social Psychology and Social Anthropology (UU485) (New March 2000)
      Protozoan, Helminth and Arthropod Parasites of Humans (VV220) (New March 2000)
      Public Health Pests, Vectors and Intermediate Hosts (VV230) (New March 2000)
    • Publication Information:
      Thesis; ISBN:9789462578579URL:http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/507289
    • Accession Number:
      20173071722
    • Copyright:
      ©2017 CAB International
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ORIA, P. A. Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya. 2016. Wageningen University, Wageningen; Netherlands, 2016. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722. Acesso em: 20 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Oria PA. Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya. Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. 2016:176. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722
    • APA:
      Oria, P. A. (2016). Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya [Wageningen University]. In Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya (p. 176).
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Oria, P. A. 2016. “Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya.” Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. Wageningen; Netherlands: Wageningen University. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722.
    • Harvard:
      Oria, P. A. (2016) Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya, Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. Wageningen University. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722 (Accessed: 20 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Oria, PA 2016, ‘Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya’, Wageningen University, Wageningen; Netherlands, Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, p. 176, viewed 20 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Oria, P. A. “Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya.” Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, Wageningen University, 2016, p. 176. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Oria, P. A. “Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya.” Combining Malaria Control with Rural Electrification: Social and Behavioural Factors That Influenced the Design, Use and Sustainability of Solar-Powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) for Malaria Elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. Wageningen University, 2016. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Oria PA. Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, western Kenya [Internet]. Combining malaria control with rural electrification: social and behavioural factors that influenced the design, use and sustainability of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. [Wageningen; Netherlands]: Wageningen University; 2016 [cited 2020 Sep 20]. p. 176. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173071722