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Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Publication Information:
      Netherlands
    • Abstract:
      This thesis focuses on the case of insects and takes on an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the factors that contribute to the acceptance (and rejection) of culturally inappropriate foods. Chapter 1 discusses what is known about culture, taste and the product as determinants of acceptance of culturally inappropriate foods, and how it will be examined in this thesis to provide new insights into the challenges involved in introducing insects into Western diets. Chapter 2 investigates how culture influences the acceptance of insects as food by comparing 2 cultural settings where insects are part of the local diet (Thailand), and one where insects are generally not regarded as food (The Netherlands). Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 study the role that taste (i.e., expected and experienced) plays in the acceptance of culturally inappropriate foods, and explores the consumer perceptions underlying the lack of sensory appeal. These chapters are based on deceptive taste experiments where Dutch consumers were led to believe that they were being served beef burger patties that contained unusual novel foods (i.e., mealworms, lamb brain, frog meat). The chapters explore how the expectations evoked by the food's identity (i.e., label) and its sensory properties (i.e., recipe) contribute towards hedonic and descriptive sensory evaluations. Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 investigate the impact of product characteristics on hedonic evaluations and consumption intentions. Chapter 5 is based on a survey of Dutch consumers that explores how the insect's visibility and product type (i.e., sweet or savoury, Western or Asian) influence product acceptability through the evaluation of product images. Perceived product appropriateness, expected sensory-liking, and willingness to buy and try insect-based products are described. Chapter 6 further investigates how product appropriateness influences the sensory-liking and willingness to buy mealworm products for trial and regular consumption with willing and unwilling tasters. These chapters provide insights into how the product contributes to acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food and highlights the challenges to be overcome during product development. Chapter 7 concludes this thesis with an overview of the main findings and a discussion of its contributions to understanding the consumer acceptance of culturally inappropriate foods. New insights revealed the complex challenges faced in the consumer acceptance and product development of culturally new foods that are not only unfamiliar but also perceived to be inappropriate for consumption. This chapter discusses the importance of culture in determining food choices and the limited role of food neophobia and demographic variables. In addition, it stresses the importance of distinguishing between liking the taste of a food and liking to eat a food, and between trying a food out of curiosity and eating it on a regular basis. The chapter addresses the dilemmas when developing products from culturally inappropriate foods, where little is known about its taste and how it should be prepared, and where the presence of an inappropriate food is sometimes sufficient to cause rejection. In conclusion, achieving consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food faces numerous challenges that extend beyond the initial psychological barriers of consuming a novel food.
    • Number of References:
      many ref.
    • Subject Terms:
      Medical & Veterinary Entomology;World Agriculture, Economics & Rural Sociology;Rural Development;Human Nutrition;Tropical Diseases
    • Subject Terms:
    • Accession Number:
      diet preferences, edible insects, labeling, labels, organoleptic properties, taste preferences, yellow mealworm beetle
    • CABICODES:
      Food Economics (EE116) (New March 2000)
      Consumer Economics (EE720)
      Meat Produce (QQ030)
      Other Produce (QQ070)
      Food Composition and Quality (QQ500)
      Social Psychology and Social Anthropology (UU485) (New March 2000)
      Human Nutrition (General) (VV100)
    • Publication Information:
      Thesis; ISBN:9789463431521URL:http://edepot.wur.nl/410874
    • Accession Number:
      20173192728
    • Copyright:
      ©2017 CAB International
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      TAN HUISHAN, T. H. S. G. ]. Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food. 2017. Wageningen University, Wageningen; Netherlands, 2017. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728. Acesso em: 22 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Tan HuiShan THSG]. Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food. Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food. 2017:174. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728
    • APA:
      Tan HuiShan, T. H. S. G. ]. (2017). Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food [Wageningen University]. In Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food (p. 174).
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Tan HuiShan, Tan, H. S. G. ]. 2017. “Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food.” Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food. Wageningen; Netherlands: Wageningen University. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728.
    • Harvard:
      Tan HuiShan, T. H. S. G. ] (2017) Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food, Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food. Wageningen University. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728 (Accessed: 22 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Tan HuiShan, THSG] 2017, ‘Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food’, Wageningen University, Wageningen; Netherlands, Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food, p. 174, viewed 22 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Tan HuiShan, Tan, H. S. G. ]. “Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food.” Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food, Wageningen University, 2017, p. 174. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Tan HuiShan, Tan, H. S. G. ]. “Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food.” Eating Insects: Consumer Acceptance of a Culturally Inappropriate Food. Wageningen University, 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Tan HuiShan THSG]. Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food [Internet]. Eating insects: consumer acceptance of a culturally inappropriate food. [Wageningen; Netherlands]: Wageningen University; 2017 [cited 2020 Sep 22]. p. 174. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20173192728