Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Address:
      Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
    • Publication Information:
      USA
    • Abstract:
      BACKGROUND: Research suggests that stress and depressed mood are associated with food-related parenting practices (ie, parent feeding practices, types of food served at meals). However, current measures of parental stress, depressed mood, and food-related parenting practices are typically survey-based and assessed as static/unchanging characteristics, failing to account for fluctuations across time and context. Identifying momentary factors that influence parent food-related parenting practices will facilitate the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting healthy food-related parenting practices. In this study, we used ecological momentary assessment to examine the association between momentary factors (eg, stress, depressed mood) occurring early in the day and food-related parenting practices at the evening meal. METHODS: Children aged 5 to 7 years and their families (N=150) from 6 racial and/or ethnic groups (n=25 each African American, Hispanic/Latino, Hmong, American Indian, Somali, and white families) were recruited for this mixed-methods study through primary care clinics. RESULTS: Higher stress and depressed mood earlier in the day predicted pressure-to-eat feeding practices and fewer homemade foods served at meals the same night. Effect modification was found for certain racial and/or ethnic groups with regard to engaging in pressure-to-eat feeding practices (ie, America Indian, Somali) or serving fewer homemade meals (ie, African American, Hispanic/Latino) in the face of high stress or depressed mood. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians may want to consider discussing with parents the influence stress and depressed mood can have on everyday food-related parenting practices. Additionally, future researchers should consider using real-time interventions to reduce parental stress and depressed mood to promote healthy parent food-related parenting practices.
    • Subject Terms:
      Human Nutrition
    • Subject Terms:
    • Accession Number:
      ethnic differences, psychological stress
    • CABICODES:
      Human Nutrition (General) (VV100)
    • ISSN:
      0031-4005
    • Publication Information:
      Journal Article; URL:http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/6/e20172295
    • Accession Number:
      20183137474
    • Copyright:
      ©2018 CAB International
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BERGE, J. M. et al. Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices. Pediatrics, [s. l.], v. 140, n. 6, p. null-2295, 2017. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474. Acesso em: 28 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Berge JM, Tate A, Trofholz A, et al. Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices. Pediatrics. 2017;140(6):null-2295. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474
    • APA:
      Berge, J. M., Tate, A., Trofholz, A., Fertig, A. R., Miner, M., Crow, S., & Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2017). Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices. Pediatrics, 140(6), null-2295.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Berge, J. M., A. Tate, A. Trofholz, A. R. Fertig, M. Miner, S. Crow, and D. Neumark-Sztainer. 2017. “Momentary Parental Stress and Food-Related Parenting Practices.” Pediatrics 140 (6): null-2295. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474.
    • Harvard:
      Berge, J. M. et al. (2017) ‘Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices’, Pediatrics, 140(6), p. null-2295. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474 (Accessed: 28 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Berge, JM, Tate, A, Trofholz, A, Fertig, AR, Miner, M, Crow, S & Neumark-Sztainer, D 2017, ‘Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices’, Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 6, p. null-2295, viewed 28 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Berge, J. M., et al. “Momentary Parental Stress and Food-Related Parenting Practices.” Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 6, 2017, p. null-2295. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Berge, J. M., A. Tate, A. Trofholz, A. R. Fertig, M. Miner, S. Crow, and D. Neumark-Sztainer. “Momentary Parental Stress and Food-Related Parenting Practices.” Pediatrics 140, no. 6 (2017): null-2295. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Berge JM, Tate A, Trofholz A, Fertig AR, Miner M, Crow S, et al. Momentary parental stress and food-related parenting practices. Pediatrics [Internet]. 2017 [cited 2020 Oct 28];140(6):null-2295. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lhh&AN=20183137474