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Implicit and explicit self-esteem in the context of internet addiction.

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  • Author(s): Stieger S;Stieger S; Burger C
  • Source:
    Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking [Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw] 2010 Dec; Vol. 13 (6), pp. 681-8. Date of Electronic Publication: 2010 May 11.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal Article
  • Language:
    English
  • Additional Information
    • Source:
      Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 101528721 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 2152-2723 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 21522715 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw Subsets: MEDLINE
    • Publication Information:
      Original Publication: New Rochelle, NY : Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Previous research has repeatedly found that people suffering from some clinical disorders (e.g., bulimia nervosa, depression) possess low explicit (i.e., conscious, deliberate) self-esteem while at the same time displaying high implicit (i.e., unconscious, automatic) self-esteem. This phenomenon has been termed damaged self-esteem and was proposed to be an indicator of psychological distress. Although Internet addiction has been found to be associated with low levels of explicit self-esteem, as well as with high levels of psychological distress, its relation to implicit self-esteem has, to our knowledge, not been investigated thus far. We therefore hypothesized that the phenomenon of damaged self-esteem could also be found amongst people suffering from Internet addiction, and conducted two studies using the Initial Preference Task as a measure of implicit self-esteem. As expected, we found that individuals scoring high on Internet addiction possess low explicit and high implicit self-esteem. This effect was, however, only found for the first name initial of the Initial Preference Task, leading to the conclusion that first and last name initials might tap into different parts of implicit self-esteem.
    • Publication Date:
      Date Created: 20101215 Date Completed: 20110325 Latest Revision: 20160511
    • Publication Date:
      20201019
    • Accession Number:
      10.1089/cyber.2009.0426
    • Accession Number:
      21142993