Error message

EDS Server Issue
Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Source:
      Publisher: Springer-Verlag Country of Publication: Germany NLM ID: 7608025 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1432-2072 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 00333158 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Psychopharmacology (Berl.) Subsets: MEDLINE
    • Publication Information:
      Original Publication: Berlin, New York, Springer-Verlag.
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Rationale: Deficient inhibitory control is predictive of increased alcohol consumption in the laboratory; however, little is known about this relationship in naturalistic, real-world settings.
      Objectives: In the present study, we implemented ecological momentary assessment methods to investigate the relationship between inhibitory control and alcohol consumption in the real world.
      Methods: Heavy drinkers who were motivated to reduce their alcohol consumption (N = 100) were loaned a smartphone which administered a stop signal task twice per day at random intervals between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. for 2 weeks. Each day, participants also recorded their planned and actual alcohol consumption and their subjective craving and mood. We hypothesised that day-to-day fluctuations in inhibitory control (stop signal reaction time) would predict alcohol consumption, over and above planned consumption and craving.
      Results: Multilevel modelling demonstrated that daily alcohol consumption was predicted by planned consumption (β = .816; 95% CI .762-.870) and craving (β = .022; 95% CI .013-.031), but inhibitory control did not predict any additional variance in alcohol consumption. However, secondary analyses demonstrated that the magnitude of deterioration in inhibitory control across the day was a significant predictor of increased alcohol consumption on that day (β = .007; 95% CI .004-.011), after controlling for planned consumption and craving.
      Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that short-term fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption, which suggests that transient fluctuations in inhibition may be a risk factor for heavy drinking episodes.
    • References:
      Addict Biol. 2010 Apr;15(2):217-26. (PMID: 20148781)
      Front Psychiatry. 2013 Oct 22;4:140. (PMID: 24155728)
      Addiction. 2012 Aug;107(8):1431-40. (PMID: 22340523)
      Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010 Sep 1;34(9):1584-9. (PMID: 20586755)
      Addict Behav. 2010 Apr;35(4):302-11. (PMID: 19932936)
      Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011 Jan;36(2):445-58. (PMID: 20927046)
      Addict Biol. 2009 Jan;14(1):22-31. (PMID: 18855805)
      Psychol Addict Behav. 2005 Jun;19(2):140-7. (PMID: 16011384)
      Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Mar 1;148:1-20. (PMID: 25637078)
      Addict Biol. 2016 Jul;21(4):873-84. (PMID: 25678237)
      Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2017 Apr;17 (2):348-363. (PMID: 27896714)
      Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jan;40(1):152-60. (PMID: 26683585)
      Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Sep;32(9):1681-7. (PMID: 18631324)
      J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Jul;55(4):475-86. (PMID: 7934056)
      Psychol Addict Behav. 2002 Jun;16(2):113-20. (PMID: 12079249)
      Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Jan;219(2):501-10. (PMID: 21735071)
      Pers Soc Psychol Rev. 2011 Nov;15(4):352-66. (PMID: 21685152)
      J Psychopharmacol. 2013 Jun;27(6):507-14. (PMID: 23598400)
      J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Sep;61(5):766-73. (PMID: 11022818)
      Psychol Assess. 2009 Dec;21(4):486-97. (PMID: 19947783)
      Trends Cogn Sci. 2008 Nov;12(11):418-24. (PMID: 18799345)
      Alcohol Alcohol. 2004 Jan-Feb;39(1):29-32. (PMID: 14691071)
      Addiction. 2013 Nov;108(11):1916-23. (PMID: 23795646)
      PLoS One. 2015 Oct 21;10(10):e0140383. (PMID: 26488166)
      J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2014 Aug;40(4):1295-300. (PMID: 24842070)
      Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Jan 1;113(1):55-61. (PMID: 20724083)
      J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1984 Apr;10(2):276-91. (PMID: 6232345)
      Front Psychol. 2010 Sep 30;1:144. (PMID: 21833213)
      J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jul;59(4):447-54. (PMID: 9647427)
      PLoS One. 2015 May 19;10(5):e0126209. (PMID: 25992573)
      Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Dec 1;145:1-33. (PMID: 25195081)
      Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2011 Dec;218(3):557-65. (PMID: 21603894)
      Psychol Addict Behav. 2005 Sep;19(3):253-62. (PMID: 16187803)
      Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010 Aug;34(8):1346-52. (PMID: 20491732)
      Health Psychol Rev. 2016 Jun;10 (2):148-67. (PMID: 25089611)
      J Res Pers. 2011 Jun 1;45(3):259-268. (PMID: 21643479)
      Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012 Apr;20(2):118-28. (PMID: 22182418)
      Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804. (PMID: 8329970)
      Trends Cogn Sci. 2012 Mar;16(3):174-80. (PMID: 22336729)
      Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 Feb 1;100(1-2):107-14. (PMID: 19041196)
      BMJ. 1996 Jan 6;312(7022):1. (PMID: 8555842)
      Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Feb;219(3):909-21. (PMID: 21833505)
      Psychol Addict Behav. 2000 Sep;14(3):277-86. (PMID: 10998953)
      J Pers Soc Psychol. 2000 May;78(5):979-94. (PMID: 10821203)
      Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Jun;221(3):361-87. (PMID: 22441659)
      J Clin Psychol. 1995 Nov;51(6):768-74. (PMID: 8778124)
      Addict Behav. 2014 Jan;39(1):345-9. (PMID: 24459697)
      J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Feb;81(1):1-12. (PMID: 23231572)
      Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2003 Feb;11(1):73-8. (PMID: 12622345)
      Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2008;4:1-32. (PMID: 18509902)
      Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Apr;23(2):122-9. (PMID: 25730418)
      Drug Alcohol Depend. 2012 Nov 1;126(1-2):118-23. (PMID: 22647899)
      Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Dec;33(12):2094-102. (PMID: 19740132)
      Br J Addict. 1992 Apr;87(4):625-33. (PMID: 1591514)
      Acta Psychol (Amst). 2003 Feb;112(2):105-42. (PMID: 12521663)
      Psychophysiology. 2004 Jan;41(1):9-20. (PMID: 14692996)
      Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jun;19(3):183-91. (PMID: 21480731)
      Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017 Oct;234(19):2979-2988. (PMID: 28741032)
      Psychol Methods. 2007 Jun;12(2):121-38. (PMID: 17563168)
      J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;45(4):468-75. (PMID: 16601652)
      Behav Res Ther. 2008 Nov;46(11):1210-9. (PMID: 18823876)
      Addiction. 2015 Jun;110(6):1035-42. (PMID: 25688760)
    • Grant Information:
      MR/K001558/1 United Kingdom Medical Research Council; MR/K023195/1 United Kingdom Medical Research Council; MR/K001558 United Kingdom Medical Research Council
    • Contributed Indexing:
      Keywords: Alcohol*; Craving*; Ecological momentary assessment*; Inhibitory control*; Stop signal task*
    • Publication Date:
      Date Created: 20180303 Date Completed: 20190220 Latest Revision: 20191210
    • Publication Date:
      20200827
    • Accession Number:
      PMC5919991
    • Accession Number:
      10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5
    • Accession Number:
      29497782
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      JONES, A. et al. Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study. Psychopharmacology, [s. l.], v. 235, n. 5, p. 1487–1496, 2018. DOI 10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=mdc&AN=29497782. Acesso em: 28 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Jones A, Tiplady B, Houben K, Nederkoorn C, Field M. Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study. Psychopharmacology. 2018;235(5):1487-1496. doi:10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5
    • APA:
      Jones, A., Tiplady, B., Houben, K., Nederkoorn, C., & Field, M. (2018). Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study. Psychopharmacology, 235(5), 1487–1496. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Jones, Andrew, Brian Tiplady, Katrijn Houben, Chantal Nederkoorn, and Matt Field. 2018. “Do Daily Fluctuations in Inhibitory Control Predict Alcohol Consumption? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” Psychopharmacology 235 (5): 1487–96. doi:10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5.
    • Harvard:
      Jones, A. et al. (2018) ‘Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study’, Psychopharmacology, 235(5), pp. 1487–1496. doi: 10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Jones, A, Tiplady, B, Houben, K, Nederkoorn, C & Field, M 2018, ‘Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study’, Psychopharmacology, vol. 235, no. 5, pp. 1487–1496, viewed 28 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Jones, Andrew, et al. “Do Daily Fluctuations in Inhibitory Control Predict Alcohol Consumption? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” Psychopharmacology, vol. 235, no. 5, May 2018, pp. 1487–1496. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Jones, Andrew, Brian Tiplady, Katrijn Houben, Chantal Nederkoorn, and Matt Field. “Do Daily Fluctuations in Inhibitory Control Predict Alcohol Consumption? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.” Psychopharmacology 235, no. 5 (May 2018): 1487–96. doi:10.1007/s00213-018-4860-5.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Jones A, Tiplady B, Houben K, Nederkoorn C, Field M. Do daily fluctuations in inhibitory control predict alcohol consumption? An ecological momentary assessment study. Psychopharmacology [Internet]. 2018 May [cited 2020 Sep 28];235(5):1487–96. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=mdc&AN=29497782