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Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder.

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  • Additional Information
    • Source:
      Publisher: Biomed Central Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 101462768 Publication Model: Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1756-0500 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 17560500 NLM ISO Abbreviation: BMC Res Notes Subsets: MEDLINE
    • Publication Information:
      Original Publication: London : Biomed Central, 2008.
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Objective: Our aim was to study within-person variability in mood, cognition, energy, and impulsivity measured in an Ecological Momentary Assessment paradigm in bipolar disorder by using modern statistical techniques. Exploratory analyses tested the relationship between bipolar disorder symptoms and hours of sleep, and levels of pain, social and task-based stress. We report an analysis of data from a two-arm, parallel group study (bipolar disorder group N = 10 and healthy control group N = 10, with 70% completion rate of 14-day surveys). Surveys of bipolar disorder symptoms, social stressors and sleep hours were completed on a smartphone at unexpected times in an Ecological Momentary Assessment paradigm twice a day. Multi-level models adjusted for potential subject heterogeneity were adopted to test the difference between the bipolar disorder and health control groups.
      Results: Within-person variability of mood, energy, speed of thoughts, impulsivity, pain and perception of skill of tasks was significantly higher in the bipolar disorder group compared to health controls. Elevated bipolar disorder symptom domains in the evening were associated with reduced sleep time that night. Stressors were associated with worsening of bipolar disorder symptoms. Detection of symptoms when an individual is experiencing difficulty allows personalized, focused interventions.
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    • Grant Information:
      KL2 TR002015 United States TR NCATS NIH HHS; UL1 TR002014 United States TR NCATS NIH HHS; UL1 TR000127 United States TR NCATS NIH HHS
    • Contributed Indexing:
      Keywords: Affective disorders; Ecological Momentary Assessment; Mania; Mood disorders; Multilevel models; Subject heterogeneity
    • Publication Date:
      Date Created: 20191206 Date Completed: 20200413 Latest Revision: 20200413
    • Publication Date:
      20200527
    • Accession Number:
      PMC6894147
    • Accession Number:
      10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7
    • Accession Number:
      31801608
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LI, H. et al. Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder. BMC research notes, [s. l.], v. 12, n. 1, p. 791, 2019. DOI 10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=mdc&AN=31801608. Acesso em: 7 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Li H, Mukherjee D, Krishnamurthy VB, et al. Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder. BMC research notes. 2019;12(1):791. doi:10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7
    • APA:
      Li, H., Mukherjee, D., Krishnamurthy, V. B., Millett, C., Ryan, K. A., Zhang, L., Saunders, E. F. H., & Wang, M. (2019). Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder. BMC Research Notes, 12(1), 791. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Li, Han, Dahlia Mukherjee, Venkatesh Basappa Krishnamurthy, Caitlin Millett, Kelly A Ryan, Lijun Zhang, Erika F H Saunders, and Ming Wang. 2019. “Use of Ecological Momentary Assessment to Detect Variability in Mood, Sleep and Stress in Bipolar Disorder.” BMC Research Notes 12 (1): 791. doi:10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7.
    • Harvard:
      Li, H. et al. (2019) ‘Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder’, BMC research notes, 12(1), p. 791. doi: 10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Li, H, Mukherjee, D, Krishnamurthy, VB, Millett, C, Ryan, KA, Zhang, L, Saunders, EFH & Wang, M 2019, ‘Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder’, BMC research notes, vol. 12, no. 1, p. 791, viewed 7 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Li, Han, et al. “Use of Ecological Momentary Assessment to Detect Variability in Mood, Sleep and Stress in Bipolar Disorder.” BMC Research Notes, vol. 12, no. 1, Dec. 2019, p. 791. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Li, Han, Dahlia Mukherjee, Venkatesh Basappa Krishnamurthy, Caitlin Millett, Kelly A Ryan, Lijun Zhang, Erika F H Saunders, and Ming Wang. “Use of Ecological Momentary Assessment to Detect Variability in Mood, Sleep and Stress in Bipolar Disorder.” BMC Research Notes 12, no. 1 (December 4, 2019): 791. doi:10.1186/s13104-019-4834-7.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Li H, Mukherjee D, Krishnamurthy VB, Millett C, Ryan KA, Zhang L, et al. Use of ecological momentary assessment to detect variability in mood, sleep and stress in bipolar disorder. BMC research notes [Internet]. 2019 Dec 4 [cited 2020 Aug 7];12(1):791. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=mdc&AN=31801608