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Body image in obesity surgery patients.

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  • Author(s): O'Neill, Jennifer. U Hartford, US
  • Source:
    Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, Vol 65(2-B), 2004. pp. 1035.
  • Publisher:
    US : ProQuest Information & Learning
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Dissertation
  • Publication Type:
    Dissertation Abstract
  • Additional Information
    • Physical Description:
      1
    • Other Journal Titles:
      Dissertation Abstracts International
    • ISSN:
      0419-4217 (Print)
    • Keywords:
      body image disturbance, obesity surgery patients, self-esteem, depression, disease onset
    • Abstract:
      This study examined body image in a clinical sample of 161 adult obesity surgery candidates and compared level of body image disturbance (BID) to that of normative non-clinical and clinical samples. Gender, ethnic/racial, and age of obesity onset differences were also examined. The relationship of self-esteem and depression to BID and the clinical predictors of BID were also studied. BID, self-esteem, and depression were assessed by the Body Shape Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Analyses revealed that obesity surgery candidates experienced a range of BID. On average, a moderate level of BID was reported. Candidates had a significantly higher level of BID than nonclinical samples and a significantly lower level of BID than obese body image therapy patients and bulimia patients. No significant differences were found between obesity surgery candidates and obese dieters. Females reported a significantly higher level of BID compared to males. No significant ethnic/racial or age of onset differences were observed. Self-esteem was negatively correlated to BID and depression was positively correlated to BID. Self-esteem significantly predicted BID. Sex and self-esteem were the most important predictors of BID in this sample. Being female and having a lower self-esteem in combination with a higher level of depression may represent risk factors for the development of BID. The desire to increase self-esteem, decrease depression, and improve body image may be what motivates candidates to seek obesity surgery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Dissertation Details:
      UMI Order Number: AAI3121368
    • Subject Terms:
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
    • Population:
      Human
      Female
    • Age Group:
      Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
    • Methodology:
      Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
    • Physical Description:
      Electronic
    • Publication Date:
      20041227
    • Accession Number:
      2004-99016-067
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      O’NEILL, J. Body image in obesity surgery patients. 2004. ProQuest Information & Learning, [s. l.], 2004. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067. Acesso em: 2 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      O’Neill J. Body image in obesity surgery patients. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. 2004;65(2-B):1035. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067. Accessed July 2, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      O’Neill J. Body image in obesity surgery patients. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. 2004;65(2-B):1035. Accessed July 2, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067
    • APA:
      O’Neill, J. (2004). Body image in obesity surgery patients [ProQuest Information & Learning]. In Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering (Vol. 65, Issue 2–B, p. 1035).
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      O’Neill, Jennifer. 2004. “Body Image in Obesity Surgery Patients.” Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. ProQuest Information & Learning. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067.
    • Harvard:
      O’Neill, J. (2004) Body image in obesity surgery patients, Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. ProQuest Information & Learning. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067 (Accessed: 2 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      O’Neill, J 2004, ‘Body image in obesity surgery patients’, ProQuest Information & Learning, Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, vol. 65, no. 2–B, p. 1035, viewed 2 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      O’Neill, Jennifer. “Body Image in Obesity Surgery Patients.” Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, vol. 65, no. 2–B, ProQuest Information & Learning, 2004, p. 1035. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      O’Neill, Jennifer. “Body Image in Obesity Surgery Patients.” Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. ProQuest Information & Learning, 2004. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      O’Neill J. Body image in obesity surgery patients [Internet]. Vol. 65, Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering. ProQuest Information & Learning; 2004 [cited 2020 Jul 2]. p. 1035. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2004-99016-067