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Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders.

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  • Author(s): South, Mikle, ORCID 0000-0003-0152-1257. Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US, South, Mikle, ORCID 0000-0003-0152-1257. Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US, ; Rodgers, Jacqui. Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom
  • Source:
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol 11, Jan 24, 2017. ArtID: 20
  • Publisher:
    Switzerland : Frontiers Media S.A.
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Journal Article
  • Publication Type:
    Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
  • Additional Information
    • Address:
      South, Mikle, [email protected]
    • Source:
      Front Hum Neurosci
    • Other Publishers:
      Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
    • ISSN:
      1662-5161 (Electronic)
    • Keywords:
      autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, medial prefrontal cortex, intolerance of uncertainty, alexithymia, mindfulness, sensory function
    • Abstract:
      Severe symptoms of anxiety add substantial additional burden to many individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Improved understanding of specific factors that contribute to anxiety in ASD can aid research regarding the causes of autism and also provide targets for more effective intervention. This mini-review article focuses on emerging evidence for three concepts that appear to be related to each other and which also strongly predict anxiety in ASD samples. Atypical sensory function is included in the diagnostic criteria for ASD and is likely an important contributor to anxiety. Difficulties in understanding and labeling emotions (alexithymia), although a co-morbidity, may arise in part from atypical sensory function and can lead to confusion and uncertainty about how to respond to social and emotional situations. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) describes people who have a particularly hard time with ambiguity and is known to be a key mechanism underlying some anxiety disorders. While evidence for linking these ideas is to date incomplete, we put forward a model including each concept as a framework for future studies. Specifically, we propose that IU is a critical mediator for anxiety in ASD, and explore the relationships between sensory function, alexithymia and IU. We further explore the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in regulating emotional response, in connection with limbic and insula-based networks, and suggest that disrupted integration in these networks underlies difficulties with habituation to strong emotional stimuli, which results in an enhanced perception of threat in many people with ASD. Behavioral and biologically-based treatments for anxiety in ASD will benefit from attending to these specific mechanisms as adjunct to traditional interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Subject Terms:
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Developmental Disorders & Autism (3250)
    • Population:
      Animal
    • Methodology:
      Literature Review
    • Physical Description:
      Electronic
    • Publication Date:
      First Posted: Jan 24, 2017; Accepted: Jan 10, 2017; First Submitted: Sep 11, 2016
    • Publication Date:
      20170403
    • Publication Date:
      20200713
    • Copyright:
      This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.. South and Rodgers. 2017
    • Accession Number:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020
    • Accession Number:
      28174531
    • Accession Number:
      2017-05203-001
    • Number of Citations in Source:
      71
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SOUTH, M.; RODGERS, J. Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, [s. l.], v. 11, 2017. DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2017-05203-001. Acesso em: 25 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      South M, Rodgers J. Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2017;11. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020
    • APA:
      South, M., & Rodgers, J. (2017). Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      South, Mikle, and Jacqui Rodgers. 2017. “Sensory, Emotional and Cognitive Contributions to Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11 (January). doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020.
    • Harvard:
      South, M. and Rodgers, J. (2017) ‘Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders’, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      South, M & Rodgers, J 2017, ‘Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders’, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol. 11, viewed 25 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      South, Mikle, and Jacqui Rodgers. “Sensory, Emotional and Cognitive Contributions to Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol. 11, Jan. 2017. EBSCOhost, doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      South, Mikle, and Jacqui Rodgers. “Sensory, Emotional and Cognitive Contributions to Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11 (January 24, 2017). doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00020.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      South M, Rodgers J. Sensory, emotional and cognitive contributions to anxiety in autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience [Internet]. 2017 Jan 24 [cited 2020 Nov 25];11. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2017-05203-001