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Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa.

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  • Author(s): Hagan, Kelsey Elizabeth. University of Kansas, Psychology, US
  • Source:
    Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol 81(4-A), 2020.
  • Publisher:
    US : ProQuest Information & Learning
  • Language:
    English
  • Document Type:
    Dissertation
  • Publication Type:
    Dissertation Abstract
  • Additional Information
    • Other Journal Titles:
      Dissertation Abstracts International
    • ISSN:
      0419-4209 (Print)
    • ISBN:
      978-1088366486
    • Keywords:
      bulimia nervosa, inhibitory control, reward processing, eating-disorder, clinicians
    • Abstract:
      Introduction: Theoretical models and empirical research support the role of negative affect in bulimia nervosa (BN). However, treatments that target negative affect in BN have not outperformed traditional, eating-disorder-focused treatments for BN. An alternative mechanism of BN is dysfunctional positive affect (i.e., reward processing). The present study aimed to understand associations among dysfunctional reward processing, affect, and eating-disorder symptom expression by testing an interactive model of reward-based processes (reward learning, effort valuation, delay discounting, inhibitory control) in women with BN. Method: Participants were community-recruited medication-free adult women aged 18–30 with BN (n = 20) or healthy controls (HCs; n = 20). Behavioral tasks and self-report measures were used to assess reward learning, effort valuation, delay discounting, inhibitory control, BN symptom frequencies, and affect. Results: Women with BN did not differ from HCs on effort valuation and inhibitory control; however, women with BN showed less delay discounting and demonstrated slower reward learning compared to HCs. Frequency of fasting and excessive exercise episodes increased as inhibitory control decreased. Slowed reward learning was associated with increased self-induced vomiting frequencies in BN. Conclusions: Results suggested a modified model of reward dysfunction in BN, with delay discounting, reward learning, and negative urgency as central features. Given the associations of reward learning, delay discounting, and negative urgency, clinicians working with persons with BN may introduce strategies, such as pleasant activity scheduling, as a means to promote positive affect, regulate negative affect, and potentially decrease symptom expression in BN. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
    • Dissertation Details:
      UMI Order Number: AAI13886233
      OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:13886233
      Advisor(s): Forbush, Kelsie
      Degree: Ph.D., 2019
      Institution: University of Kansas
      Department: Psychology
    • Subject Terms:
    • PsycINFO Classification:
      Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
    • Population:
      Human
      Female
    • Age Group:
      Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
      Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
      Thirties (30-39 yrs)
    • Methodology:
      Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
    • Physical Description:
      Electronic
    • Publication Date:
      20200507
    • Accession Number:
      2020-28119-109
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HAGAN, K. E. Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa. 2020. ProQuest Information & Learning, [s. l.], 2020. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109. Acesso em: 5 jun. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Hagan KE. Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. 2020;81(4-A). http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109. Accessed June 5, 2020.
    • APA:
      Hagan, K. E. (2020). Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa [ProQuest Information & Learning]. In Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences (Vol. 81, Issue 4–A).
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hagan, Kelsey Elizabeth. 2020. “Reward Processing and Inhibitory Control in Women with Bulimia Nervosa.” Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. ProQuest Information & Learning. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109.
    • Harvard:
      Hagan, K. E. (2020) Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa, Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. ProQuest Information & Learning. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109 (Accessed: 5 June 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hagan, KE 2020, ‘Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa’, ProQuest Information & Learning, Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences, vol. 81, no. 4–A, viewed 5 June 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Hagan, Kelsey Elizabeth. “Reward Processing and Inhibitory Control in Women with Bulimia Nervosa.” Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences, vol. 81, no. 4–A, ProQuest Information & Learning, 2020. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hagan, Kelsey Elizabeth. “Reward Processing and Inhibitory Control in Women with Bulimia Nervosa.” Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. ProQuest Information & Learning, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hagan KE. Reward processing and inhibitory control in women with bulimia nervosa [Internet]. Vol. 81, Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. ProQuest Information & Learning; 2020 [cited 2020 Jun 5]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=psyh&AN=2020-28119-109