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Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China.

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      School of Health Sciences, Global Health Institute, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China
      School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
      Department of Infection Management, Department of Logistics, The Third People's Hospital of Hubei Province, Wuhan, China
      Department of Medical Care, People's Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China
      School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
    • Abstract:
      Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are among the biggest global public health challenges, and overlap widely. These infections cause significant morbidity and mortality, put pressure on health systems, and incur rising direct and indirect costs.Aim: This study analysed the direct medical burden attributable to AMR-HAIs in Chinese public tertiary hospitals, and aimed to inform both the medical regulators and hospital managers for better control of HAIs and containment of AMR.Methods: The propensity score matching method (γ= 0.25σ, nearest neighbor 1:1 matching) was applied to conduct a retrospective cohort study in five public tertiary hospitals in the Hubei province of China during 2013-2015. Descriptive analysis, Pearson's chi-squared test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired/independent Z/T test were conducted. The statistically significant level was set at P<0.05.Findings: From 2013 to 2015 overall, the additional total medical expenditure per HAI-AMR inpatient was US$15,557.25 compared with that of the non-HAIs, and the additional length of per hospital stay of the HAI-AMR inpatient was 41 days compared with that of the non-HAIs (P<0.001).Conclusions: In combination with AMR, HAIs caused significant additional medical expenses and affected the turnover rate of hospital beds. Most of the increased medical costs fell to patients and their families. These findings call for more effective control of HAIs and containment of AMR. A national study is needed to estimate the medical, social and economic burden of HAIs in combination with AMR.
    • Journal Subset:
      Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland
    • ISSN:
      0195-6701
    • MEDLINE Info:
      PMID: NLM31931043 NLM UID: 8007166
    • Publication Date:
      In Process
    • Publication Date:
      20200611
    • DOI:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003
    • Accession Number:
      143639789
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LIU, X. et al. Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China. Journal of Hospital Infection, [s. l.], v. 105, n. 2, p. 295–305, 2020. DOI 10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143639789. Acesso em: 15 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Liu X, Cui D, Li H, et al. Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China. Journal of Hospital Infection. 2020;105(2):295-305. doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003
    • APA:
      Liu, X., Cui, D., Li, H., Wang, Q., Mao, Z., Fang, L., Ren, N., & Sun, J. (2020). Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China. Journal of Hospital Infection, 105(2), 295–305. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Liu, X., D. Cui, H. Li, Q. Wang, Z. Mao, L. Fang, N. Ren, and J. Sun. 2020. “Direct Medical Burden of Antimicrobial-Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: Empirical Evidence from China.” Journal of Hospital Infection 105 (2): 295–305. doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003.
    • Harvard:
      Liu, X. et al. (2020) ‘Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China’, Journal of Hospital Infection, 105(2), pp. 295–305. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Liu, X, Cui, D, Li, H, Wang, Q, Mao, Z, Fang, L, Ren, N & Sun, J 2020, ‘Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China’, Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 105, no. 2, pp. 295–305, viewed 15 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Liu, X., et al. “Direct Medical Burden of Antimicrobial-Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: Empirical Evidence from China.” Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 105, no. 2, June 2020, pp. 295–305. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Liu, X., D. Cui, H. Li, Q. Wang, Z. Mao, L. Fang, N. Ren, and J. Sun. “Direct Medical Burden of Antimicrobial-Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: Empirical Evidence from China.” Journal of Hospital Infection 105, no. 2 (June 2020): 295–305. doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.003.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Liu X, Cui D, Li H, Wang Q, Mao Z, Fang L, et al. Direct medical burden of antimicrobial-resistant healthcare-associated infections: empirical evidence from China. Journal of Hospital Infection [Internet]. 2020 Jun [cited 2020 Aug 15];105(2):295–305. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=rzh&AN=143639789