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Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement.

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  • Additional Information
    • Keyword(s):
      ecological momentary assessment; micro-break; Recovery; within-person fluctuations; work engagement
    • Abstract:
      Non-work social media use at work has seen a dramatic increase in the last decade and is commonly deemed counterproductive work behaviour. However, we examined whether it may also serve as a micro-break and improve work engagement. We used ecological momentary assessment across 1 working day with up to 10 hourly measurements in 334 white-collar workers to measure non-work social media use and work engagement, resulting in 2235 hourly measurements. Multilevel modelling demonstrated that non-work social media use was associated with lower levels of work engagement between persons. Within persons, non-work social media use was also associated with lower concurrent work engagement. However, non-work social media use was related to higher levels of work engagement 1 hour later. While more extensive non-work social media use at work was generally associated with lower work engagement, our advanced study design revealed that the longer employees used social media for non-work purposes during 1 working hour, the more work engaged they were in the subsequent working hour, suggesting that employees turn to social media when energy levels are low and/or when they (temporarily) lose interest in their work. This behaviour may serve as a break, which in turn increases work engagement later during the day. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR
    • Author Affiliations:
      1 Department for Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Trier, Trier, Germany; 2 Institute of Psychology and Education, Work and Organizational Psychology, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; 3 Institute for Occupational Health Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 4 Institute for Advanced Social Research, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
    • ISSN:
      02678373
    • Publication Type:
      Publication Type: Article Update Code: 20180713
    • Accession Number:
      130647731
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SYREK, C. J. et al. Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement. Work & Stress, [s. l.], v. 32, n. 3, p. 209–227, 2018. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731. Acesso em: 27 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Syrek CJ, Kühnel J, Vahle-Hinz T, De Bloom J. Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement. Work & Stress. 2018;32(3):209-227. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731
    • APA:
      Syrek, C. J., Kühnel, J., Vahle-Hinz, T., & De Bloom, J. (2018). Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement. Work & Stress, 32(3), 209–227.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Syrek, Christine J., Jana Kühnel, Tim Vahle-Hinz, and Jessica De Bloom. 2018. “Share, like, Twitter, and Connect: Ecological Momentary Assessment to Examine the Relationship between Non-Work Social Media Use at Work and Work Engagement.” Work & Stress 32 (3): 209–27. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731.
    • Harvard:
      Syrek, C. J. et al. (2018) ‘Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement’, Work & Stress, 32(3), pp. 209–227. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731 (Accessed: 27 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Syrek, CJ, Kühnel, J, Vahle-Hinz, T & De Bloom, J 2018, ‘Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement’, Work & Stress, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 209–227, viewed 27 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Syrek, Christine J., et al. “Share, like, Twitter, and Connect: Ecological Momentary Assessment to Examine the Relationship between Non-Work Social Media Use at Work and Work Engagement.” Work & Stress, vol. 32, no. 3, July 2018, pp. 209–227. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Syrek, Christine J., Jana Kühnel, Tim Vahle-Hinz, and Jessica De Bloom. “Share, like, Twitter, and Connect: Ecological Momentary Assessment to Examine the Relationship between Non-Work Social Media Use at Work and Work Engagement.” Work & Stress 32, no. 3 (July 2018): 209–27. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Syrek CJ, Kühnel J, Vahle-Hinz T, De Bloom J. Share, like, twitter, and connect: Ecological momentary assessment to examine the relationship between non-work social media use at work and work engagement. Work & Stress [Internet]. 2018 Jul [cited 2020 Sep 27];32(3):209–27. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=s3h&AN=130647731